<br><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div><div class="h5">
&gt; Somehow the holy grill of every manager is to create a meta-language in<br>
&gt; which the tests will be written, and the coding should be a framework that<br>
&gt; reads it and execute it.<br>
&gt; The fact that tests wildly vary is a minor annoyance. :-)<br><br>
</div></div>Maybe you need to introduce the *idea* of Fit <a href="http://fit.c2.com/" target="_blank">http://fit.c2.com/</a><br>
Then they can write their test case in Excel files.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>How does it helps with tests that vary wildly?</div><div>I&#39;m trying to do permission testings in a web app, and identified 104 permit-able actions.</div>
<div>Some of the actions are simple and have a pattern. for example, make sure that the right menu items are visible, and clicking on them won&#39;t lead you to an error page.</div><div>Or make sure that a certain link exists in a screen. Of course, to be really sure that the link actually do something we need to click on it, and the result of that is harder to make a pattern of.</div>
<div>And then, there are the completely un-patterned actions. can the user see his entries? other&#39;s entries? which can he edit? can he publish his entries? </div><div>At this point every few tests have their own pattern and need their own setup/cleanup code. </div>
<div><br></div><div>My opinion is that with some code abstraction you can make a test program that is clear and easy to write tests in. </div><div><br></div><div>Shmuel.</div></div></div>