<div dir="ltr"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Nov 15, 2012 at 3:52 AM, Shmuel Fomberg <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:shmuelfomberg@gmail.com" target="_blank">shmuelfomberg@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div>Hi All.</div><div><br></div><div>... when people tell me that some feature is in Perl from version 5.11.3.</div><div>

or maybe, in case of modules, 2.04_07</div><div>I&#39;m sorry, I only think in release versions. how does that map to a &quot;real&quot; version?</div>
<div><br></div><div>this is just an annoying show-off. </div></blockquote><div><br>First of all, relax. Breath. Calm down. :)<br><br>The purpose of development versions is that they help with gradual changes and upgrades and finger-grained testing and quality assurance before major releases.<br>

<br>Often times people refer to the development version that introduced a change because the stable hasn&#39;t gone out, or because they worked very closely with the project and thus associate a feature with the time it went out and the development release that went with it.<br>

<br>Also, it&#39;s rare, but sometimes development releases actually go out as part of a major stable release. Some Perl releases went out with development releases of modules, which prompted a thread on p5p asking to stop doing that after it messed up cpanminus.<br>

<br>Since the underscore is just a separator, 2.04_07 means 2.0407. The next version up (say, 2.05) would be the matching stable release.<br>It shouldn&#39;t be complicated, especially for you.<br><br>S.<br></div></div></div>