<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Mar 20, 2011 at 9:54 AM, David Baird <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:davidlbaird@gmail.com" target="_blank">davidlbaird@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">


IMHO, a nice change to Perl would be to defer loading class modules<br>
until the first Class::Module-&gt;new() statement is encountered, and at<br>
that point, Perl would &quot;require&quot; but not &quot;import&quot; the module. This is<br>
sufficient for most class modules, and would save time on initial<br>
loading of a script.<br></blockquote><div><br>I would be very much against it. You sometimes *want* to load everything in compile time. When I have a long running process in which the start time doesn&#39;t matter (Gabor gave web applications as a good example), I want as much stuff to be loaded beforehand (assuming of course I didn&#39;t use insane memory-consuming modules, and have a correct server configuration) than to start loading a module when a user tries to login, for example.<br>


<br>I actually agree with both Gabor and Shmuel on this issue. Shmuel raises the point that you should be careful of your use of &quot;require&quot;. Many programmers sprinkle &quot;require&quot; statements all over without understand how it works (hey, no import!) and without trying to utilize the correct form of it. Gabor, on the other hand, says that some applications *really* do need to use &quot;require&quot; (heh.. &quot;use require&quot;) whenever possible, and that&#39;s true too.<br>


<br>I say, as long as you know *why* you&#39;re using it and you&#39;re using it *wisely*, it&#39;s perfectly fine, and sometimes desired.<br><br>tl;dr: have a good day. :)<br><br>Sawyer.<br></div></div></div>