[Perl] Designing the Ultimate Presentation Tool

Shlomi Fish shlomif at vipe.stud.technion.ac.il
Tue Nov 12 23:30:22 PST 2002


On Wed, 13 Nov 2002, Shlomo Yona wrote:

> On Tue, 12 Nov 2002, Shlomi Fish wrote:
>
> > 1. Renders into a nice directory structure a la quad-pres (with dirs,
> > sub-dirs, up, down, next, prev work nicely, etc.).
>
> Mine has this.
>
> > 2. Fully standards compliant - X/HTML 1.0 Strict with CSS and good link
> > rel.
>
> Mine does this.
>
> > 3. Can generate DocBook format out of the well-formed HTML. (to satisfy
> > DocBook lovers.)
>
> Hmmm....
> Good idea.
> Mine does not support this (yet).
>
> Does DocBook support mathematical notations?

It can either very crudely or with MathML, which is not supported
everywhere, and I don't know the state of its support.

> If it does - how does this display as HTML?

HTMP supports <sup> and <sub> for sub-script and super-script. The new
standard has MathML which is overly verbose to be effective, but enables
writing equations very nice. (it is recommended that it would be generated
with something else)

> Which fonts are used?
>

It depends on the browser. The mozilla people are working on MathML
support now. Internet Explorer has it if you install MathType or a similar
plug-in.

>
> > 4. Several viewing modes: static HTML pages, all-in-one-page, dynamically
> > by CGI, local on a hard disk.
>
> Mine does this.
>
> > 5. Automatic Syntax Highlighting via gvim, a2ps and similar tools.
>
> This is a great feature, that due to my ignorance my tool lacks.
> PLEASE PLASE teach me how to do this (without me needing to reimplement
> a syntax highlighter myself). :-)
>

First of all "man enscript" will tell you how to convert code to HTML
using enscript. There is a command line syntax in ViewCVS. Secondly, there
is a gvim command line that does it. (which is different for UNIX and
Win32): Ira Abramov once gave it once in a Linux-IL post:

gvim -f gen_makefile.pl -c ':so $VIMRUNTIME/syntax/2html.vim' -c ':wq' -c
':wq'

Note that it creates <font> stuff that has to be converted to <span style>
if you want it to be X/HTML. I have a script that does it at home.

So far I did it manually, but maybe I'll write something to cache the
syntax highlighted and render it.

> > 6. Input can be written in HTML, WebMetaLanguage, PerlPoint and similar
> > formats.
>
> Mine supports:
> 	1. HTML (any version)
> 	2. My own metalanguage.
>

I liked PerlPoint because it was very brief. WML supports putting input in
other formats such as POD or SDF, and can convert it to HTML. I can write
such plug-ins for other languages.

> > 7. Easy optional integration with Subversion (and assuming it becomes
> > free enough) BitKeeper.
>
> What are those?
>

Revision Control Systems. Like CVS - only much better.

> > 8. WML - gives custom tags custom templates, etc.
>
> Please explain.
>

<define-tag quote endtag="required">
<i class="quote">%body</i>
</define-tag>

> > 9. Point by point formation. (like Gabor wanted)
>
> What is this?
>

It means you first see:

<<<
1. Point One
>>>
Then

<<<
1. Point One

2. Point Two
>>>

and then

<<<
1. Point One

2. Point Two

3. Point Three
>>>

> > 10...Inf - what you suggest.
>
> Keep it simple syntax.
> Or, at least allow minimal syntax for presentations.
> One of the problems with existing tools is that the syntax and working
> method is too complex, and you need to know a lot even just to create
> the most modest presentation.
>

You'll still be able to use HTML there. Just if you care to learn, you'll
find that there's much more which can make your job easier. Like Perl. ;-)

Regards,

	Shlomi Fish

>
>



----------------------------------------------------------------------
Shlomi Fish        shlomif at vipe.technion.ac.il
Home Page:         http://t2.technion.ac.il/~shlomif/

He who re-invents the wheel, understands much better how a wheel works.




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